Hybrid solar eclipse visible from Canada today

Hybrid solar eclipse visible from Canada today Luc Viatour
Hybrid solar eclipse visible from Canada today (photo courtesy Luc Viatour)

Hybrid solar eclipse visible from Canada today

A solar eclipse was visible today in a number of places around the world, including parts of eastern Canada wherever it was not obscured by clouds. In most locations, it was visible beginning at sunrise. The eclipse was known as a hybrid solar eclipse, in that it changes between being an annular eclipse and a total eclipse. The portion of the eclipse visible from North America was a partial eclipse, while some other parts of the world saw a total eclipse.

Canadian cities from which the eclipse was expected to be visible include Toronto, Halifax, Montreal, Ottawa and St. John’s. In all of those but St. John’s, the eclipse began at dawn. The eclipse was also expected to be visible in the eastern United States around the same time. All of these locations were in the path of a partial eclipse, but other places could see a total eclipse. The path of the total eclipse began in the Atlantic south of Bermuda before passing through Africa, including parts of Uganda, Ethiopia, Kenya and Somalia.

According to predictions by the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada:

In Toronto, the eclipse peaked at 6:58 a.m. and end at 7:11 a.m.
In Ottawa, it peaked at 6:47 a.m. and end at 7:12 a.m.
In Montreal, it peaked at 6:35 a.m. and end at 7:12 a.m.
In Halifax, it peaked at 7:16 a.m. and end at 8:15 a.m.
In St. John’s, it eclipse started at 7:02 a.m., and peaked at 7:42 a.m. and ended at 8:49 a.m.

This overview map of the Nov. 3, 2013 annular and total solar eclipse, a hybrid solar eclipse, shows the path of the event. Cartographer Michael Zeiler of Eclipse-Maps.com created this map.
This overview map of the Nov. 3, 2013 annular and total solar eclipse, a hybrid solar eclipse, shows the path of the event. Cartographer Michael Zeiler of Eclipse-Maps.com created this map.

A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon is directly between the Sun and a point on the surface of the Earth, obscuring part or all of the Sun from view. In a partial eclipse, a dark “bite” appears to be missing from the disk of the Sun. In an annular eclipse, the Sun appears as a ring of light surrounding a dark central region. In a total eclipse, the entire surface of the Sun is hidden from view by the Moon.

Were you able to catch the eclipse this morning?

On The Web:
solar eclipse visible from Canada today
http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/rare-hybrid-solar-eclipse-to-appear-today-1.2325257

Sunday’s Solar Eclipse To Be Rare, Dramatic ‘Hybrid’ Event
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/02/sunday-solar-eclipse-rare-hybrid_n_4202543.html

Sean is a London (Ontario) based writer, and has been writing full-time for eCanadaNow since May of 2005, covering Canadian topics and world issues. Since 2009, Sean has been the lead editor for eCanadaNow. Prior to his work writing and editing for the eCanadaNow, he worked as a freelancer for several Canadian newspapers.. You can contact Sean at {Sean at ecanadanow.com] Google