Breach Of A Lifetime – Humpback Whales In Bay Bulls, Newfoundland

In a moment seldom seen, and even more rarely captured, onlookers were presented with a captivating moment of the beauty of nature in Bay Bulls, Newfoundland on Sunday when two humpback whales breached the watery depths at the same time. A group of sight seekers on a whale watching tour spotted the rare double breach. Though it is not uncommon for more than one whale to break the surface at the same time, it is, however, uncommon to see them do so at the same time and so close together.

Beneath the dark waters lies a beautiful world of large bodies, long slender fins and soulful eyes of these mastic giants. Humpback whales have brought a sense of wonder since the dawn of their time. From folklore to legends to stories of the ages, people have been fascinated by these beings. Though they may be large and slow moving, their grace is evident in their oceanic dances of breaches. Once they emerge from the waves, they rise up, as though momentarily suspended in midair, then twist their bodies and come crashing back down, leaving behind a geyser of sea spray.

Newfoundland is home to many of these endangered creatures. The coast of Newfoundland guides them along the Canadian border where breeding and hunting grounds are most habitable for them. Though often seen alone, they come together in communities, known as pods, for migration, hunting and breeding. Humpback whales are one of the most intelligent species of oceanic life. They sing complex songs, work cooperatively for hunting, and can recognize their mate in a pod just from their clicking noises.

The rare moment seen by the onlookers is more common to be spotted during the winter months during the breeding season. Males will exhibit elaborate displays of breaching, tail slapping, and flipper slapping as well as rolling.

In times of seldom seen events, we should take a moment to marvel at the majestic beauty of life, and these beautiful creatures delivered a spectacular reminder of just how amazing, captivating and breathtaking life beyond the ocean depths really is.

Humpback Whale, blowholesCC BY-SA 3.0 D. Gordon E. Robertson - Own work Young whale with blowholes clearly visible  Humpback Whale (Megaptera novaeangliae), two blowholes clearly visible, St. Mary's Ecological Reserve, Newfoundland and Labrador
Humpback Whale, blowholesCC BY-SA 3.0
D. Gordon E. Robertson – Own work
Young whale with blowholes clearly visible
Humpback Whale (Megaptera novaeangliae), two blowholes clearly visible, St. Mary’s Ecological Reserve, Newfoundland and Labrador

Jason is a native of Calgary but now spends his days on the East Coast in Port aux Basques, Newfoundland.

Jason has been working part-time for eCanadaNow since 2010.Jason mostly covers sci/tech stories as well as entertainment news.

Prior to his work writing and editing for eCanadaNow, he worked in sales and marketing. You can email Jason at {Jason at ecanadanow.com]