North Carolina Lost Colony Close To Being Found: Researchers

The Roanoke Colony, also known as the Lost Colony, established on Roanoke Island, in what is today's Dare County, North Carolina, United States, was a late 16th-century attempt by Queen Elizabeth I to establish a permanent English settlement. The enterprise was originally financed and organized by Sir Humphrey Gilbert, who drowned in 1583 during an aborted attempt to colonize St. John's, Newfoundland. Sir Humphrey Gilbert's half-brother, Sir Walter Raleigh, later gained his brother's charter from the Queen and subsequently executed the details of the charter through his delegates Ralph Lane and Richard Grenville, Raleigh's distant cousin.
The Roanoke Colony, also known as the Lost Colony, established on Roanoke Island, in what is today’s Dare County, North Carolina, United States, was a late 16th-century attempt by Queen Elizabeth I to establish a permanent English settlement. The enterprise was originally financed and organized by Sir Humphrey Gilbert, who drowned in 1583 during an aborted attempt to colonize St. John’s, Newfoundland. Sir Humphrey Gilbert’s half-brother, Sir Walter Raleigh, later gained his brother’s charter from the Queen and subsequently executed the details of the charter through his delegates Ralph Lane and Richard Grenville, Raleigh’s distant cousin.
A clue discovered just a few years ago on a centuries-old map has led researchers back to a North Carolina site in hopes of discovering whether the men, women and children of North Carolina’s “Lost Colony” settled there.

In 2012, researchers with the First Colony Foundation and the British Museum announced they had found a tantalizing clue about the fate of the Lost Colony, the settlers who disappeared from Roanoke Island in the late 16th century.

“If we were finding this evidence at Roanoke Island, which is the well-established site of Sir Walter Raleigh’s colony, we would have no hesitation to say this is evidence of Sir Walter Raleigh’s colonies,” said Phil Evans, president of the First Colony Foundation. “But because this is a new site and not associated with Sir Walter Raleigh, we have to hesitate and ask questions and learn more. It’s not Roanoke Island. It’s a new thing, and a new thing has to stand some tests.”

That clue on a map led foundation researchers back to a site where they had previously found artifacts years ago. More recent digs found more artifacts that appear to be of the correct time period.

According to History:

Investigations into the fate of the “Lost Colony” of Roanoke have continued over the centuries, but no one has come up with a satisfactory answer. “Croatoan” was the name of an island south of Roanoke that was home to a Native American tribe of the same name. Perhaps, then, the colonists were killed or abducted by Native Americans. Other hypotheses hold that they tried to sail back to England on their own and got lost at sea, that they met a bloody end at the hands of Spaniards who had marched up from Florida or that they moved further inland and were absorbed into a friendly tribe. In 2007, efforts began to collect and analyze DNA from local families to figure out if they’re related to the Roanoke settlers, local Native American tribes or both. Despite the lingering mystery, it seems there’s one thing to be thankful for: The lessons learned at Roanoke may have helped the next group of English settlers, who would found their own colony 17 years later just a short distance to the north, at Jamestown.

The final group of colonists disappeared during the Anglo-Spanish War, three years after the last shipment of supplies from England. Their disappearance gave rise to the nickname "The Lost Colony". To this day there has been no conclusive evidence as to what happened to the colonists.
The final group of colonists disappeared during the Anglo-Spanish War, three years after the last shipment of supplies from England. Their disappearance gave rise to the nickname “The Lost Colony”. To this day there has been no conclusive evidence as to what happened to the colonists.

On The Web:
North Carolina Lost Colony
http://www.wral.com/researchers-hopeful-that-nc-site-is-that-of-lost-colony/14368163/

North Carolina Lost Colony
http://www.newsmax.com/TheWire/north-carolina-lost-colony-map-clue/2015/01/20/id/619683/

Sean is a London (Ontario) based writer, and has been writing full-time for eCanadaNow since May of 2005, covering Canadian topics and world issues. Since 2009, Sean has been the lead editor for eCanadaNow. Prior to his work writing and editing for the eCanadaNow, he worked as a freelancer for several Canadian newspapers.. You can contact Sean at {Sean at ecanadanow.com] Google